Education Center

Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Category
Search by Format
Sort By
Search by Type
Search by Category
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    CPG for AFO and FES post-stroke

    The purpose of this course is to introduce the CPG in order to provide evidence to guide clinical decision-making for the use of either AFO or FES as an intervention to improve body function and structure, activity and participation as defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for individuals with post-stroke hemiplegia with decreased lower extremity motor control.

    Course published July 2024

    Lisa Brown PT, DPT, NCS (Moderator)

    Clinical Associate Professor

    Boston University Sargent College

    Dr. Lisa Brown is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Boston University Sargent College where she is a core faculty member in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program. Dr. Brown received her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in 2009 with a certificate of Advanced Study in Neurology, and her BS in Physical Therapy from the University of Vermont in 1993. Dr. Brown is an ABPTS Board certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist since 2009. Dr. Brown is co-lead author on the clinical practice guideline on the use of ankle foot orthoses and functional electrical stimulation post stroke and a member of the Knowledge Translation Task force for the CPG. She has clinical experience and has presented at national and international conferences. Dr. Brown is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapists, and has 25 years of clinical practice experience. She currently treats individuals with neurologic disorders at the BU Physical Therapy Center.

    No disclosures.

    Therese E. Johnston, PT, MSPT, PhD, MBA (Moderator)

    Professor

    Arcadia University

    Therese Johnston, PT, MSPT, PhD, MBA is a Professor of Physical Therapy at Arcadia University, Glenside, PA, USA and a per-diem Physical Therapist at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Johnston received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania, her MBA in Health Administration from St. Joseph’s University, her MS in Physical Therapy from Arcadia University, and her PhD in Physical Therapy from Temple University. Her research has included interventions to improve the health, fitness, and function of children and adults with spinal cord injury or cerebral palsy, with a special focus on the use of functional electrical stimulation and cardiovascular and bone health. Dr. Johnston was the co-lead author on the clinical practice guideline on the use of ankle foot orthoses and functional electrical stimulation post stroke. She has published over 60 articles in peer reviewed journals and has presented nationally and internationally. She is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society. She is currently the chair of the EDGE (Evaluation Database to Guide Effectiveness) task force within the Academy of Physical Therapy Research.

    No disclosures.

    Elizabeth Cornforth PT, DPT, NCS (Moderator)

    Assistant Professor

    MGH Institute of Health Professions

    Dr. Elizabeth Cornforth is a faculty member in the physical therapy program at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston, MA, where she helps to teach their neurological content and also maintains a clinical appointment in the outpatient department at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. She has a diverse clinical background working in both the inpatient and outpatient physical therapy environment over the last two decades with individuals with neurological diagnoses. Beth served as a member of the Critical Appraisal Team for the Orthotics and Neuroprosthetics Clinical Practice Guideline and as a Co-Chair for the Knowledge Translation Taskforce for the Orthotics and Neuroprosthetics Clinical Practice Guideline. She is passionate about improving the physical therapy outcomes for individuals with neurological diagnoses and teaching the next generation of physical therapists that will work with them.

    No disclosures.

    Bobbette Miller, DPT, NCS (Moderator)

    Clinical Associate Professor

    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences

    Bobbette Miller, DPT, NCS, is a physical therapist, educator, and researcher. As a faculty member at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, she brings extensive expertise in neurologic physical therapy to both the classroom and clinical settings. Additionally, she plays a pivotal role in patient care at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation MS Center of Excellence, where their clinical insights contribute to advancing treatments for Multiple Sclerosis. She is committed to excellence in education and patient care and is dedicated to empowering fellow physical therapists through continued learning and development.

    No disclosures.

    Megan Greenwood DPT, PCS, NCS (Moderator)

    Physical Therapist

    Hasbro Children’s Hospital

    Dr. Megan Greenwood is a practicing physical therapist at Hasbro Children's Hospital and is a board certified Pediatric Clinical Specialist, Neurologic Clinical Specialist and member of the Knowledge Translation Task Force.

    No disclosures.

    Ryan Koter, DPT, NCS (Moderator)

    Physical Therapist

    Shepard Center

    Dr. Ryan Koter is a practicing physical therapist at the Shepard Center and is a board certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist and member of the Knowledge Translation Task Force.

    No disclosures.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    PART 2 of this Webinar series will introduce interventions to advance the clinical practice for treatment of autonomic dysfunction, as well as problem-solve how to overcome barriers when working with this complex patient population. ANPT Hot Topic Webinar from June 12, 2024

    Autonomic dysfunction is a rapidly evolving area in medicine due to improved understanding of its role in persistent post-concussion symptoms (PPCS) and long-COVID. Approximately 70 million people worldwide are affected by autonomic disorders. The umbrella term dysautonomia is inclusive of more than 15 subtypes associated with dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with three of the most prevalent being Orthostatic Intolerance (OI), Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), and Orthostatic Hypotension (OH). Dysautonomia is often triggered by various neurological conditions or immune system responses such as brain injury, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson’s Disease, as well as viral infections including COVID-19. As recognition improves, some patients will be identified as having autonomic dysfunction and may present with only mild symptoms. However, the majority of patients experience impairment across multiple domains impacting quality of life and community participation with the level of disability being compared to CHF and COPD. Although there is no known cure, prescribed symptom-guided progressive physical exercise is currently accepted as the most effective treatment to improve ANS regulation, regardless of clinical presentation or reported symptoms. Strategies for identifying and managing dysautonomia have been proposed in the literature, with recent updates providing clearer guidelines to physical therapists in clinical management of this evolving condition.

    Course Recorded June 2024

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    PART 1 of this Webinar series will aim to improve clinician awareness and understanding of the common autonomic dysfunction subtypes and outline examination techniques. ANPT Hot Topic Webinar from June 5, 2024

     Autonomic dysfunction is a rapidly evolving area in medicine due to improved understanding of its role in persistent post-concussion symptoms (PPCS) and long-COVID. Approximately 70 million people worldwide are affected by autonomic disorders. The umbrella term dysautonomia is inclusive of more than 15 subtypes associated with dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with three of the most prevalent being Orthostatic Intolerance (OI), Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), and Orthostatic Hypotension (OH). Dysautonomia is often triggered by various neurological conditions or immune system responses such as brain injury, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson’s Disease, as well as viral infections including COVID-19. As recognition improves, some patients will be identified as having autonomic dysfunction and may present with only mild symptoms. However, the majority of patients experience impairment across multiple domains impacting quality of life and community participation with the level of disability being compared to CHF and COPD. Although there is no known cure, prescribed symptom-guided progressive physical exercise is currently accepted as the most effective treatment to improve ANS regulation, regardless of clinical presentation or reported symptoms. Strategies for identifying and managing dysautonomia have been proposed in the literature, with recent updates providing clearer guidelines to physical therapists in clinical management of this evolving condition.

    Course Recorded June 2024

    Lauren Ziaks

    PT, DPT, ATC, NCS

    Park City Hospital, Intermountain Health, Canyons Region

    Dr. Lauren Ziaks earned a Bachelors in Athletic Training and a Doctorate in Physical Therapy, with a concentration in Business, from Northeastern University. Since 2015, Dr. Ziaks has built a specialized comprehensive concussion management program which she now leads at Park City Hospital. She has also served as a lab instructor and guest lecturer for multiple universities over a 10 year period. Her clinical focus is in autonomic disorders and vision and vestibular rehabilitation to address chronic headaches, difficulty with school/work, reading deficits, attention deficits, exercise intolerance, and dizziness and balance issues post head trauma. Dr. Ziaks’ research focuses on examination and treatment of concussion and dysautonomia, which has been disseminated as peer-reviewed publications, poster presentations and conference workshops at local, state and national levels. Her speaking experience includes poster presentations at 10 state and national conferences, workshop presentations at state and national conferences including CSM 2023 and 2024, development of a CEU approved course for PTWebucation and presentations at local and institution-based conferences for more than 6 years.

    Lauren has completed paid and unpaid speaking engagements for dysautonomia and concussion management and has written educational content for both disorders.

    Jenna Tucker

    PT, DPT, NCS, CBIS

    Department of Physical Therapy, Kean University

    Dr. Jenna Tucker is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Kean University, where she has served as the Neurological Content Coordinator since 2019. Dr. Tucker earned her Doctorate in Physical Therapy, with a minor in psychology, from Northeastern University in 2011. Her clinical practice has included inpatient, outpatient and home-care rehabilitation for adults with neurologic dysfunction, specializing in brain injury. She has been a Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Neurologic Physical Therapy since 2014 and a Certified Brain Injury Specialist since 2012. She is a member of the Brain Injury Alliance of New Jersey Board of Trustees. Dr. Tucker’s research focuses on brain injury rehabilitation and examination/treatment of dysautonomia. Her speaking experience includes workshop symposia at national and state-wide conferences, poster presentations at international, national and state-wide conferences.

    No Disclosures

  • Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Concussion Clinical Practice Guideline serves as a tool in the implementation of evidenced informed evaluation and intervention strategies for individuals requiring physical therapy after concussion injury. Physical therapists play a vital role in identification and treatment of impairments contributing to continued symptoms. This course is designed to utilize case-based clinical reasoning to assist learners in application of the CPG in clinical context. 4 clinical cases will be presented in a grand round fashion that span the lifespan for immediate implementation into clinical practice. Contextual factors that also play a role in recovery will also be addressed to enhance experiential learning and real-world scenarios commonly encountered in clinical practice.

    Learning Objectives: 
    By the end of the course, learners will be able to:
    1. Identify concussion-related impairments contributing to continued symptoms.
    2. Incorporate patient education specific to contextual factors exacerbating symptoms.
    3. Integrate evidence-based evaluation components for each clinical trajectory addressed by physical therapy.
    4. Compare and contrast validated outcome measures utilized to track progress and aid in clinical decision making specific to concussion injury.
    5. Design appropriate interventional strategies based on objective findings and principles of neuroplasticity for optimal outcomes.
    6. Discuss the role of a multidisciplinary team approach in concussion management.
    7. Utilize objective measures to assist in return to activity/school/play decision making.

    Course published February 2024

    Becky Bliss

    PT, DPT, DHSc

    Becky Bliss, PT, DPT, DHSc: is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at the University of Missouri and is board certified in Neurological Physical Therapy. She also serves the role of Program Coordinator for the Neurological Physical Therapy Residency. She holds her Certificate in Vestibular Rehabilitation from the APTA, as well as Advanced Vestibular Certificate and is an Impact Trained Physical Therapist. Becky graduated from Ithaca College Department of Physical Therapy with a combined undergraduate-graduate Master of Physical Therapy in 2001. She completed her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Des Moines University in 2014 and her Doctor of Health Science from the University of Indianapolis in 2019. Becky has been actively practicing in the field of physical therapy for 21 years with specialization in concussion management since 2006. Her research interests include dysfunction of the vestibular ocular reflex following mild traumatic brain injury as well as early detection of impairments that lead to post-concussion syndrome and currently has several active studies specific to higher level motor control deficit identification in the sport athlete. Becky is active within the Academy of Neurological Physical Therapy and serves on the Knowledge Translation Committee for the Concussion CPG as well as is part of the core committee of the APTA Concussion CPG Revision group.


    Ethan Hood

    PT, DPT, MBA

    Ethan Hood, PT, DPT, MBA, is an assistant professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at DeSales University in Center Valley, Pennsylvania, where he teaches within the neurologic curriculum. He earned a Bachelor’s of Health Sciences and Master o Physical Therapy from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, a Master of Business Administration from Pennsylvania State University, and Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Temple University. He is a board certified clinical specialist in both geriatric and neurologic physical therapy. Ethan has been practicing for 25 years with an emphasis in outpatient neuro, vestibular dysfunction, and concussion management. He has instructed continuing education courses for physical therapists and other healthcare practitioners on the treatment of dizziness and concussion management nationally. He is an active member of both the Academy of Geriatric and Neurologic Physical Therapy, and a member of the ANPT vestibular SIG where he has helped produce vestibular related podcasts for over 8 years. He has published research on concussion assessment and is a member of the ANPT’s Concussion CPG Knowledge Translation Task Force.

    Michelle L Gutierrez

    PT, DSc

    Michelle L Gutierrez, PT, DSc, is a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso. She received her Master’s in Physical Therapy from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and her Doctor of Science from the University of Alabama Birmingham. She is a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso. She has clinical experience working with both orthopedically and neurologically involved service members. Michelle worked in a direct access environment for many years in the military setting. She has published research on concussion assessment. She has taught continuing education courses for practicing therapists and medical providers regionally and nationally. She is a member of several academies of the American Physical Therapy Association including Neurology, Home Health, and Education and has held various elected offices in the Vestibular Rehabilitation Special Interest Group. She is currently serving on the ANPT’s Concussion CPG Knowledge Translation Task Force.

    John Heick

    PT, PhD, DPT

    John Heick is an Associate Professor and Program Director for the Phoenix and Flagstaff campuses and teaches at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona. John received his clinical Doctorate and Master's degree in Physical Therapy from Shenandoah University. John received his Ph.D. in 2015 from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions in Orthopaedic and Sports Science and his dissertation was on concussion assessment. Prior to physical therapy education, John was a medic in the Air Force for 12 years in a primary care clinic and performed aero- medical evacuation in various aircraft. John has practiced physical therapy for 19 years in various settings to include the emergency department, sports, orthopaedics, neurologic, wound care, aquatics, inpatient rehabilitation, acute care and in a balance center. John continues to practice clinically prn in an orthopaedic/sports outpatient clinic and in a pro bono Orthopaedic clinic. John is board certified by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties in orthopaedics, neurology, and sports. John was awarded the James A. Gould Excellence in Teaching Orthopaedics Physical Therapy Award by the Academy of Orthopaedics and is a recipient of the Lucy Blair Service Award by the APTA. John is a member of the ANPT’s Concussion CPG Knowledge Translation Task Force.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Neurologic clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are becoming more accepted in neurologic rehabilitation as a means for elevating practice, but clinical predictions rules (CPRs) are also starting to emerge in this area of practice. Evidence indicates that most physical therapy clinicians, educators, and students don’t feel comfortable utilizing CPRs, and those individuals who do feel confident with them are largely focused on musculoskeletal based CPRs. This webinar will compare CPGs and CPRs, and it will discuss how CPRs can be utilized to inform a clinician’s decision-making process when working with individuals post-traumatic SCI. The session will review clinical predictions rules focuses on the likelihood a patient will return to walking at 1 year post injury. Case application will be provided and opportunities to discuss challenges and solutions for implementing the CPR in practice will be presented. ANPT Practice Committee Hot Topics Webinar from January 2022


    Course Recorded January 2023

  • Contains 24 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Maintaining balance, successfully navigating the environment, and driving safely each depend on one’s ability to accurately estimate gravity, determine spatial orientation, and perceive self- and environmental-motion. Persons affected by health conditions such as vestibular loss, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and cerebellar degeneration frequently present to neurologic and geriatric physical therapists due to challenges associated with impairments in these functions. Additionally, these problems may also occur in otherwise healthy younger and older adults, especially when encountering complex environmental stimuli. Despite differences in the underlying physiological or pathophysiological processes, misperception of uni-sensory and disordered multi-sensory integration lead to common challenges related to falls; impaired obstacle avoidance, aperture negotiation, and wayfinding; and/or visually-induced motion sickness. Advances in the understanding of multi-sensory perception are leading to the development of novel interventions for these multifaceted problems. In this session, the presenters will review the basic mechanisms of multi-sensory processing in gravity estimation, verticality perception, spatial orientation, navigation, and self-motion perception in the context of perceptual challenges that are frequently reported by physical therapy patients; discuss patient-oriented and performance-based assessments of multi-sensory perception; summarize emerging treatments for impaired functional mobility associated with common perceptual challenges; and outline future research opportunities based on clinically-relevant questions.

    Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    1. Describe the perceptual processes involved with normal balance, gait, and motion perception; 

    2. Understand and apply strategies for assessment of multi-sensory perception in the context of common perceptual challenges; 

    3. Understand and apply strategies for treatment of persons who present with common perceptual challenges; 

    4. Utilize concepts from current research on perception and practical experience to develop clinically-relevant questions to guide future scientific inquiry and improve patient care.

    Course Published April 2024

    Colin Grove

    PT, DPT, MS, PhD

    Colin Grove is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Emory University School of Medicine, and he is the Director and Principal Investigator of the Emory Applied Vestibular Physiology Laboratory. He completed his Doctor of Physical Therapy at Temple University and his PhD in Clinical Investigation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Grove also completed a fellowship in vestibular physiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Neurologic Physical Therapy; prior to joining Emory University, he held clinical positions at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. Dr. Grove’s clinical focus and scholarly interests relate to advancing care for persons with dizziness and balance disorders.

    Eric Anson

    PT, PhD

    Eric Anson, PT, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He has practiced vestibular rehabilitation for more than 15 years. His research interests include age-related changes in vestibular function, the functional impact of vestibular disorders and concussion, and adaptability of vestibular perception in vestibular rehabilitation.

    Behrang Keshavarz

    PhD

    Behrang Keshavarz, PhD is a scientist at KITE-Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the Toronto Metropolitan University, Toronto, Canada. His research combines virtual reality technologies with traditional behavioral and neuro-cognitive measures to investigate human cognition, perception, and performance. Dr. Keshavarz’s research focuses on motion perception and associated challenges such as motion sickness.

    Consultant

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Enhance you foundational understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the vestibular system.

    Vestibular Rehabilitation has become an integral part of physical therapy practice across the continuum of care. However, many physical therapists have not had the opportunity to engage in this area of specialty practice. This course is a designed to meet the needs of individuals wishing to enhance their foundational understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the vestibular system.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Describe the components of the peripheral vestibular system
    2. Understand the role of the vestibulo-ocular reflex
    3. List central vestibular pathways
    4. Explain the phases of nystagmus

    Course Launched October 2021

    Sara Oxborough

    PT

    Sara Oxborough received her Bachelor of Arts in Kinesiology and Master's Degree in Physical Therapy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She gained interest in Vestibular Rehabilitation while doing clinical rotations in her hometown of Kenosha, WI, where she learned the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation, as well as the rewards of therapy. 

    Sara has been the director of the Physical Therapy Department at National Dizzy and Balance Center since 2008.  She enjoys treating a wide range of vestibular disorders especially concussion and vestibular migraine. Sara received Competency Certifications from Emory University, Atlanta, GA and American Physical Therapy Association in Vestibular Rehabilitation in 2009. In addition to clinic practice, Sara is a member of the leadership team of the Vestibular Special Interest Group through the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Sara was involved in the development of the American Physical Therapy Association sponsored course entitled Expanding Neurologic Expertise: Introduction to Vestibular Rehabilitation, for which this course was based on.  She was involved in presenting many times nationally as well.  Sara has done many presentations through the Twin Cities regarding vestibular disorders and recently spoke at APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting regarding telehealth and vestibular therapy.

    Jennifer Nash

    PT, DPT, NCS, CEEAA

    Dr. Jennifer Nash received her undergraduate degree in Exercise Physiology at University of Arizona and her master’s and doctorate degrees in Physical Therapy from Northern Arizona University.  She has been a board certified neurologic clinical specialist since 2006. She is a multiple sclerosis certified specialist as well as a certified exercise expert for aging adults.   Dr. Nash is an Assistant Professor in the School of Physical Therapy at University of Nevada, Las Vegas teaching neuro rehabilitation, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, professional development, balance and vestibular rehabilitation as well as mentoring service-based learning projects focused on fall prevention.  She is involved with evidence-based fall prevention programs as a Stepping On Master trainer and Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance Instructor as well as serving as the Vice Chair of the Nevada Goes Falls Free Coalition. In addition, Dr. Nash was the co-director and instructor for APTA ANPT Regional Course titled Introduction to Vestibular Rehabilitation and is currently the Vice Chair for the Nevada Physical Therapy Board.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Enhance you understanding of various vestibular diagnosis in order to effectively manage a range of patients with dizziness and imbalance, and to identify individuals requiring referral for specialty support.

    Vestibular Rehabilitation has become an integral part of physical therapy practice across the continuum of care. However, many physical therapists have not had the opportunity to engage in this area of specialty practice. This course is a designed to meet the needs of individuals wishing to enhance their understanding of various vestibular diagnosis in order to effectively manage a range of patients with dizziness and imbalance, and to identify individuals requiring referral for specialty support.

    Course Launched September 2022

    Sara Oxborough

    PT

    Sara Oxborough received her Bachelor of Arts in Kinesiology and Master's Degree in Physical Therapy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She gained interest in Vestibular Rehabilitation while doing clinical rotations in her hometown of Kenosha, WI, where she learned the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation, as well as the rewards of therapy. 

    Sara has been the director of the Physical Therapy Department at National Dizzy and Balance Center since 2008.  She enjoys treating a wide range of vestibular disorders especially concussion and vestibular migraine. Sara received Competency Certifications from Emory University, Atlanta, GA and American Physical Therapy Association in Vestibular Rehabilitation in 2009. In addition to clinic practice, Sara is a member of the leadership team of the Vestibular Special Interest Group through the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Sara was involved in the development of the American Physical Therapy Association sponsored course entitled Expanding Neurologic Expertise: Introduction to Vestibular Rehabilitation, for which this course was based on.  She was involved in presenting many times nationally as well.  Sara has done many presentations through the Twin Cities regarding vestibular disorders and recently spoke at APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting regarding telehealth and vestibular therapy.

    Jennifer Nash

    PT, DPT, NCS, CEEAA

    Dr. Jennifer Nash received her undergraduate degree in Exercise Physiology at University of Arizona and her master’s and doctorate degrees in Physical Therapy from Northern Arizona University.  She has been a board certified neurologic clinical specialist since 2006. She is a multiple sclerosis certified specialist as well as a certified exercise expert for aging adults.   Dr. Nash is an Assistant Professor in the School of Physical Therapy at University of Nevada, Las Vegas teaching neuro rehabilitation, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, professional development, balance and vestibular rehabilitation as well as mentoring service-based learning projects focused on fall prevention.  She is involved with evidence-based fall prevention programs as a Stepping On Master trainer and Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance Instructor as well as serving as the Vice Chair of the Nevada Goes Falls Free Coalition. In addition, Dr. Nash was the co-director and instructor for APTA ANPT Regional Course titled Introduction to Vestibular Rehabilitation and is currently the Vice Chair for the Nevada Physical Therapy Board.

  • Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learn to implement the Locomotor CPG by using case studies and resources.

    This course will explain the scope and objectives of the Locomotor Clinical Practice Guideline* and review the Locomotor Clinical Practice Guideline recommendations in the form of action statements. It will also describe the underlying relationship of these recommendations to the principles of experience-dependent neuroplasticity and identify the “active ingredients” that contribute to the recovery of walking function. Participants will learn strategies to implement the Locomotor CPG in clinical practice through use of case studies, videos, and resources available on the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy website.

    * The complete title is "Clinical Practice Guideline to Improve Locomotor Function Following Chronic Stroke, Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury, and Brain Injury."

    Lisa Goodwin

    PT, DPT

    University of Vermont Medical Center

    Lisa Goodwin, PT, DPT is a supervisor and clinician at the inpatient acute rehabilitation facility at the University of Vermont Medical Center, and is a Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist. She is the clinical site Coordinator for this facility and, also serves as adjunct faculty at Tufts University.  She is the Co-Chair for the ANPT Knowledge Translation Task force for the Clinical Practice Guideline for Locomotor Function.   

    Lauren Szot

    PT, DPT

    TIRR Memorial Hermann

    Lauren Szot, PT, DPT is an Associate Clinical Professor at Texas Woman’s University School of Physical Therapy in Houston, TX, a clinician at TIRR Memorial Hermann in the inpatient neurologic rehabilitation setting, and a Board-Certified Neurologic Clinical Specialist. She serves as residency mentor and faculty for the TIRR Memorial Hermann Neurologic Residency Program.  She also serves as a member of the ANPT Knowledge Translation Task Force for the Clinical Practice Guideline to Improve Locomotor Function.

    Maghan Bretz

    St. Vincent Evansville Neurologic Residency Program

    Maghan Bretz is a 2001 University of Evansville graduate with her Master of Physical Therapy. She currently serves as an outpatient physical therapist, Site Coordinator of Clinical Education, Director of the St. Vincent Evansville Neurologic Residency Program and adjunct faculty member in the Doctoral Physical Therapy Program at the University of Evansville. She achieved board certification in neurologic physical therapy in 2016. She currently serves as a committee member on the Locomotor Training Clinical Practice Guideline Knowledge Translation Task Force, charged with dissemination and implementation of current evidence on walking recovery in the stroke, brain injury and spinal cord injury populations

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation is an engaging course on vestibular function

    Vestibular input plays a vital role in cognitive abilities, especially related to visuospatial skills (i.e., understanding/interpreting visuospatial information for function and navigation). Recently, this relationship between cognition and vestibular function has been more carefully studied and findings have implications for physical therapists (PTs), particularly those working in geriatrics. Older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) have a higher prevalence of vestibular impairment than cognitively-intact age-matched peers; this may be relevant in understanding some of their visuospatial impairments. PT-directed vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is effective in managing vestibular impairment in older adults, but individuals with MCI or AD are not routinely referred for VR, perhaps because of assumptions about inability to participate and/or benefit. This presentation will: (1) discuss how cognitive impairment impacts motor learning; (2) review the latest evidence associating vestibular and spatial cognitive functioning in older adults and discuss the relevance of these findings for PTs; (3) share methods of assessing spatial cognition in the clinical environment and discuss the potential of vestibular training to be protective to spatial cognitive functioning; (4) share a framework for VR with individuals with AD and “lessons learned” from a recent pilot project; and (5) discuss future directions for research and clinical practice related to cognition and VR.

    Learning Objective:
    1. Discuss the impact of MCI and AD on motor learning and its relevance to PT.
    2. Discuss the inter-relatedness of vestibular function and cognition, especially spatial cognitive skills;
    3. Apply strategies for quantifying spatial cognition in a physical therapy setting;
    4. Integrate lessons learned from a pilot program of vestibular physical therapy for individuals with dementia;
    5. Anticipate the direction of future research to inform the role of vestibular rehabilitation in older adults and the potential use as a preemptive intervention for cognitive decline.

    Course Recorded November 2021

    Julie D. Ries

    PT, PhD

    Julie D Ries, PT PhD, is a Professor of Physical Therapy at Marymount University (Arlington VA). She received her BS in Physical Therapy from Quinnipiac College (Hamden CT), MA in Education & Human Development from George Washington University, and PhD from Nova Southeastern University. She has extensive clinical experience across settings working with older adults and individuals with neurological diagnoses. Her current research interests revolve around assessment & treatment of function & balance in individuals with dementia.

    Brooke N. Klatt

    PT, DPT, PhD

    Brooke N. Klatt, PT, DPT, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Pittsburgh. She received her BS in Kinesiology from Penn State University, DPT from New York University, PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Pittsburgh, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University. Her research is primarily focused on optimizing activity and participation in people with vestibulopathy. She works clinically in the outpatient neurologic and vestibular setting at UPMC Centers for Rehab Services in Pittsburgh, PA and she is an ABPTS board certified neurologic clinical specialist.

    Eric Anson

    PT, PhD

    Eric Anson, PT, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He has practiced vestibular rehabilitation for more than 15 years. His research interests include age-related changes in vestibular function, the functional impact of vestibular disorders and concussion, and adaptability of vestibular perception in vestibular rehabilitation.